A Cost the World Can No Longer Afford

On the first week of a new year and a new decade, one of the largest economy in the world indirectly attacked the 26th largest economy by killing one of its most beloved generals. The Iranian general Qasem Soleimani was killed in an airstrike in Baghdad, Iraq just three days into the new year. Incidentally, the U.S.’ long involvement in Iraq came after a preemptive attacked in 2003 by the United States and a small coalition of largely NATO members countries and allies. The unprovoked attack against Iraq at that time, stood in contradiction to the collective will of the United Nations. It is a new decade and the protracted occupation in that area continues, particularly with a price tag of 2.4 trillion dollars according to figures from the Congressional Budget Office.
A cost that nearly tripled the 2018 initial 627 trillion dollar trade deficit, which the U.S. has blamed on China in a bitter trade standoff; Despite the United States’ major markets outsourcing jobs, manufacturing and product development to China as well as gargantuan military spending (at the cost of civilian productivity), The U.S. government has on all levels (Executive and Congressionally) stood behind the current administration’s trade war stance.

On the first week of a new year and a new decade, one of the largest economy in the world indirectly attacked the 26th largest economy by killing one of its most beloved generals.

Once again the U.S. and its allies stand in opposition against the world. Spreading itself ever thinner and funneling more money away from domestic projects. Once again the U.S. is poised for another military offensive. According to the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs at Brown University, the United States has spent 6.4 trillion dollars on wars and missions around the world. These figures also include the many “counter-terrorism” operations the U.S. government is conducting in 80 countries around the world, not to mention the secret missions and J-SOC destabilization forces whose locations and costs remain confidential.

According to the Watson Institute of International and Public Affairs at Brown University, the United States has spent 6.4 trillion dollars on wars in Asia and the Middle East.

While such operations undoubtedly stretch and overextend U.S. capacities abroad, they also hamper the progress of smaller states who must remain under foreign occupation. Particularly, of concern and incalculable loss is the oil market left in ruins by war in the region. According to a 2012 Al-Jazeera report, when the former administration pulled out of Iraq, Western oil companies did not.  International pundits are then left to ponder why commercial enterprises from occupying states are even in the region to do business? The question remains, as well as the cost of unprovoked invasions and cell missions. Once again, the world watches as chaos ensues and the sovereignty of nation-states take a backseat. We are left wondering what the new decade will bring to civil society and world markets. Will violence be the only thing to which growing world economies can expect should they seek to forge a new direction or their economies begin to scale?  What will be the worlds answer?